NYCC 2014: Cosplay Roundup

Every year I attend New York Comic Con more and more fans cosplay. It’s tough picking favorites but the ones that made me squee the most were Death from East of West and Steven Universe and his mom as Garnet. Oh and here’s my post about my Sailor Moon (aka Sailor Goon), Space Dandy and Spike Spiegel cosplay.



Movies & TV & Video Games & Podcasts



East of West #9: The Black Experience Done Right


Writer: Jonathan Hickman
Art: Nick Dragotta
Colors: Frank Martin
Publisher: Image Comics

People of color are underrepresented and misrepresented in comics (we should all know that by now). However, there are some creators who do diversity right. (Quick shout-out to the creators of ChewSaga and Nowhere Men, to name a few.) This issue of East of West took it a step further and not only had an issue full of black folk, but it gave them depth and realism.


East of West is a crock-pot that’s brewing an oncoming apocalypse and each issue is an ingredient. Because of this, there isn’t much progression in the story, just more world expansion and history lessons. The newest ingredient is the black Kingdom of New Orleans. This is where Jonathan Hickman does the black experience justice.

Too many black characters in comics are what I like to call “happenstance black”. Their blackness has little or nothing to do with the character’s personality. They are the token black character. Don’t get me wrong, just because a character is black doesn’t mean everything about that character should do with race and racism. But it cannot be ignored either.

The King of New Orleans mentions that the other nations call blacks “oilmen, like it was a slur”. This was a smart way to add an aspect of racial realism. Even the last name of Jonathan Freeman gives the reader more insight into this family and their core values. But these are not simply race-related plot devices just for the sake of it, they blend effortlessly with the story.

East of West shows us that it’s possible to incorporate the black experience into a comic in a genuine way… if you give a damn.

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Anime, Comic Book & Other Geeky Valentine’s Day Jewelry

Batman Earrings  Engraved Dark Knight Rises by LaserCutJewelry

Comic Book Jewelry Batman Earrings Dark Knight Rises Heart Stud Earrings

Ponyo and Sosuke Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea by jennyloveskawaii

Anime Jewelry Studio Ghibli Ponyo and Sosuke Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea Anime Cameo Pendant Necklace

Spirited Away Chihiro and Haku Dragon Anime by jennyloveskawaii

Anime Jewelry Studio Ghibli Spirited Away Chihiro and Haku Dragon Cameo Necklace

Sailor Moon Cosmic Heart Compact by Ge3kedUp  

Anime Jewelry Sailor Moon Cosmic Heart Compact NecklacePokemon Misty Anime Japanese Cameo Pendant by jennyloveskawaii  

Pokemon Jewelry Misty Anime Japanese Cameo Pendant Necklace

Guitar Pick Necklace  Character or by RedLotusDesignz

Anime Jewelry Necklace - Sailor Moon and Tuxedo Mask Necklace

I Choose You PokéHeart  Pokémon Inspired by monsterkookies

Pokemon Jewelry I Choose You PokeHeart - Pokemon Inspired Industrial Steampunk Heart Necklace Pendant

Love Potion Necklace in Silver by ANORIGINALJEWELRY

Chemistry Jewelry Love Potion Necklace in Silver

Sterling Silver Serotonin Molecule Necklace With by katgirl86

Geek Nerd Science Jewelry Sterling Silver Serotonin Molecule Necklace With Leather Cord Valentines

I Say LOVE  Wood Pendant Necklace by cricketstudiogallery

Comic book Jewelry I Say LOVE Wood Pendant Necklace

For the Love of Batman Friendship Necklaces  Laser by LicketyCut

Comic Book Jewelry For the Love of Batman Friendship Necklaces

Chained Mad Love by Geekropology

Comic Book Jewelry Batman Joker and Harley Quinn Chained Mad Love


Death Note Ryuk Manga Necklace by OneWord111

Anime Jewelry Death note Ryuk Manga Necklace


Tattoo Tuesday Featurette- Shane’s Comic Book Ink

So there I was, at New York Comic Con sitting in the front row of the Grant Morrison panel waiting for it to start and buzzing with excitement, when I glance to the man to my right and saw Grant’s face on his arm! I freaked out (in a good way) and switched seats with my friend to ask him all about his amazing Grant Morrison tattoo. After we bonded over Grant for a bit he showed me even more comic book tattoos that he had. Jackpot!

Tattoo Tuesday is one of my favorite things to blog about. I love tattoos and geek things and love it even more when they combine. As I’ve said many times, Grant Morrison’s The Invisibles is what got me into reading comics. He blew my mind and changed the way I thought about a lot of things. So when I saw Shane’s tattoo, I knew Grant must have affected his life in an amazing way and wanted to hear all about it. By the way, Shane’s middle name is Bruce Wayne. Yeah, pretty awesome.

Tattoo Tuesday Featurette Interview with Shane:

Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

I’m 23 years old, from Westchester, NY. I’ve been reading and collecting comics since the age of 5 (no joke I bagged and boarded my comics and organized them alphabetically at that age) I love the geek/comic culture and have always dreamed of working in the industry.

What are your tattoos of, and why did you get them?

I started getting tattooed at the age of 15, mostly traditional old school work, mainly because as far back as I could remember I’ve always seen myself with tattoos. So it’s more about evening out my outer appearance with my inner. Recently I’ve only been getting comic related tattoos and its all I really plan on getting from here on out (besides a descendants one I got last month) because it really describes who I am and what I’m about.

I’ve been tattooed by multiple artists over the years, now I strictly stick with my dudes, Vicente Guizar at House of Ink in Mt Vernon and Dan Mountain from Ink Studio also in Mt Vernob

Any plans for future tattoos?

Absolutely I’m currently working on a Batman half sleeve which I’ve been planning since as far back as I can remember. And many more to come after that.

I met you at a Grant Morrison panel and judging by your tattoo of him, he’s made a big impact in your life. Can you explain how Morrison’s work has affected your life?

I feel that Grant is the most influential and controversial writer of our time. His work really saved my life. I first started reading his work on Animal Man but discovered who he actually was when he was doing The Invisibles, then became a die hard fan around the time he started his epic run on Batman. His work has been influential to me and something I really hold dear. As a person he’s very positive and spiritual which I really admire. I believe people these days need to focus on the solution and not the problems, and to practice love in all our affairs.

Which authors and comics have been most influential in your life and why?

Besides Grant, I grew up loving Mike Allred’s Madman, Jim Lee’s WildC.A.T.S and most of all Chuck Dixon, Frank Miller, Jim Starlin and all the other Batman writers of the 90s, that’s what really got me into comics and shaped my favorite character for me growing up. I really enjoy obscure characters and have a total dude crush on Namor the Submariner. Geoff Johns run on JSA to my favorite books ever. And I’ve really been enjoying EVERYTHING Scott Snyder has been doing. Aside from comics, Deepak Chopra, Kahlil Gibran, Emmet Fox, today in life I try to practice being positive and living my life in the light. Notice I said try… nobody’s perfect.

If you were on a deserted island what video game, comic/book, movie, TV show would you bring?

I don’t really play video games. But I’d go with The Avengers arcade, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Captain Ron (for comedic relief) and Batman TAS.

Where can we find you on the Internet?

On the roof with commissioner Gordon. Or on Instagram: bigblued

If you’re interested in being featured in a Tattoo Tuesday or Tattoo Tuesday Featurette please email me at jamila@girlgonegeekblog(dot)com or girlgonegeekblog[at]gmail[.]com


NYCC- Writers Room: Grant Morrison, Brian K. Vaughan & Jonathan Hickman

“Writers block is another word for video games.” – BVK

Panelists: Grant Morrison, Brian K. Vaughan, Jonathan Hickman and moderated  Ron Richards

  • –  On the topic of scripts, Brian K. Vaughan said that for him they are a love letter from him to his artist.
  • –  A fan asked if the writers have the entire story outlined or predetermined before beginning a new series. BKV felt that writers are the pilot of an airplane, either you know what you’re doing from the beginning, or you don’t let anyone know that you have no idea what you’re talking about.
  • –  The writers had very different styles of how they approach the art of the comic. BVK told us that Fiona Staples (artist for Saga) doesn’t like to know what’s going to happen in the series, she likes to be surprised every time she gets a new script.
  • –  Ever wonder what happens when the art doesn’t quite match what the writer had in mind? Grant Morrison said he never asks artists to redraw anything, you work around it. His fellow panelists agreed.

    Ran into BVK on the show floor and he signed my TPB of Saga. He was very nice!

  • –  An audience member wanted to know how the writers decide on how many panels to put on each page. BVK feels that 5 panels and about 12 balloons work for him. It’s like a haiku, it feels right.
  • –  Jonathan Hickman said that 5 panels a page also gives the artist a chance to have a stellar panel in the middle of the page.
  • – BVK’s writing style starts off with long drafts and then he edits and cuts and hopes the good stuff is left. After years of writing he likes to let the art do the talking when possible.
  • –  On the subject of voice, Morrison stated that he hears the voices of the characters in his head. He knows them, he knows what they like and what they don’t like, so it’s easier to write in their voice. Vaughan stated he is the complete opposite.
  • –  A fan asked how they deal with reader feedback and all panelists agreed that they don’t care. BVK explained further, “It’s the writer versus him or herself, I don’t care about feedback.” Morrison admitted that, “We don’t even know how to deal with feedback,” Hickman rounded out the answer, “No one hates me like me. I’m way rougher on myself than anyone else.”
  •  – When it comes to starting and leaving an ongoing series, BVK compared it to a relationship. You love them and then you leave them and you want them to be happy, you just don’t want to see it.

    Grant Morrison

  • –  On the importance of  adding autobiographical elements to their work, Morrison likes to write about situations that he’s experienced. BVK agreed that it’s the surest way to make something unique.
  • –  When asked what they do about writer’s block, the panelists stated they don’t experience writers block. When it comes down to it, writing is supposed to be hard. If you’re feeling like you’re in a rut, you have to push through it.  Vaughan said, “Writers block is another word for video games.”

NYCC 2012: Batman- Death Comes to Gotham Panel

Hell hath no fury like the Joker scorned.

This is a combination of the the Batman: Death Comes to Gotham panel and a bit of the DC New 52 panel, focusing on Batman the highly anticipated Joker story arc that affects all the Bat-family.

Scott Snyder gave the New York Comic Con audience a peak inside the twisted mind of the Joker and a glimpse into this dark arc. In short, Joker is the jester and Batman is the king. The Joker went away for a year and he’s upset with Batman because he thinks he has been weakened by his new Bat-family (Nightwing, Robin, Batgirl, etc.) They have made him lazy and fat and he’s back in Gotham to make things right again.

The Joker serves Batman to make him stronger. In order to make Batman stronger, he plans to kick his ass, turn his world upside down and kill his family… but it’s all out of love. Joker believes Batman will be a better king if he survives what’s coming his way.

The point of a jester is to bring the worst news to the king and make him laugh about it. It just so happens that the Joker is not only the bearer of bad news, but also the reason for it. The villains serve Batman, not his Bat-family. The Joker wants to show Batman that the villains are the ones that truly love him. To prove this to Batman, Joker plans to kill his family.

The Joker attacks members of the Bat-family by targeting their greatest weaknesses. He’s been watching them all and he knows what they are most afraid of. He’s going to take their deepest fears and make them very real for everyone. Each attack is personalized. Despite the connected arc, each book in the Bat-family stands on its own. Both Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo warned the audience that this storyline isn’t for the faint of heart, and if you’ve read Batman issue 13, you’re already well aware of that.

Panelists: Scott Snyder (Batman), Grant Morrison (Batman, Incorporated), Kyle Higgins (Nightwing), Mike Marts (Batman Group Editor), Gregg Hurwitz (Batman: The Dark Knight), David Finch (Batman: The Dark Knight), Marcus To (Batwing), Peter Tomasi (Batman & Robin), James Tynion IV (Talon) & more

Ran into Scott Snyder on the floor. A genuinely nice guy!

Scott Snyder signing comics in artist alley

NYCC 2012- Grant Morrison Spotlight

As some of you may know, I have a deep love and admiration for Grant Morrison. In short, his opinions and work constantly force me to challenge the way I think and understand the world, universe and everything in between. (You can read all about why here.) Over the course of the convention, I heard at least three people say that Morrison’s work literally saved their life. That fact alone should show the impact this man leaves in people’s lives. This spotlight was predominantly fan questions and I thought it would be easier to recap the spotlight in a bulleted format.

  • –  The moderator described Happy, Morrison’s new four issue series, as A Christmas Story on meth.
  • –  The creepy song “ Pegasus”, by The Hollies inspired Morrison to create Happy.
  • –  He described Happy as a buddy cop movie.
  • –  He also announced that Rza (Wu-Tang Clan) is working on a script for one of his works and they instantly bonded over UFOs.
  • –  He recently finished working on Aliens vs. Dinosaurs and he thinks Hollywood is getting more psychedelic and would love to have The Filth made into movie.
  • –  On the topic of superheroes, Morrison said he identifies with superheros and believes everyone probably does in some way. They illustrate social realism. They are able to talk about real life in ways that realism cannot handle. Hence, the fantastical elements.
  • –  Morrison believes Superman is a man for the people. He gives us what we need, when we need it. He represents the ultimate man and Morrison always thought Superman was a half Christ, half Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. figure. He also emphasized that Batman himself has become an architype.
  • –  Superheros ask us, “I am better than you, can you live up to me?” They are noble and help elevate us out of negative cynicism. Nothing is impossible and there’s always a way. 
  • –  He believes the 5th dimension is inside our head. He told the audience to think about one universe, now think about two, now think about ten. That is an example of how our mind is infinite and holds no bounds. The imagination is the 5th dimension.
  • A fan asked Morrison if he thought the world would end in December and he replied, no. “The apocalypse is us projecting our morality to the world.”, he went on to explain.
  • –  Morrison was juggling about 15 things in 2010 and was almost at the point of mental illness. But he stressed to never reject an opportunity to work.
  • –  In regards to why Buddy Baker in his run of Animal Man was involved in animal rights, he explained that his cat died while writing it and he loves animals and wanted to give his animal friends a good story.
  • –  He’s not a fan of “the red” concept in Animal Man because he feels it makes Buddy seem like a sub-Swamp Thing. He stressed that he is a fan of Jeff Lemire and the other ST writers, but personally doesn’t like the red in relation to Animal Man.
  • –  Flex Mentallo was inspired by ecstasy, mushroom and rave culture.
  • –  A fan asked what to do if you’re practicing magic and bad things happen. Morrison simply responded by saying the same way you always deal with bad things.
  • –  In addition, if you ever conjure up a demon, he said they don’t like logic or shapes and it’s easy to talk them out of existence.

Press Release from Legendary Comics about Grant Morrison’s Annihilator to be released in 2013:

Morrison brings to the pages a thrilling story starring wild-living screenwriter Ray Spass, who has one last chance to save his career as he struggles to write a new studio tent-pole movie, Annihilator.

The film centers around the incredible adventures of Max Nomax; a sci-fi rebel anti-hero who’s condemned to a haunted prison orbiting a supermassive black hole, following an epic struggle against the all-knowing, all–powerful artificial life form VADA and his squad of deadly Annihilators. Found guilty of the Greatest Crime in History, Nomax has vowed to clear his name by discovering a Cure for Death itself and resurrecting his lost love.

But with deadlines looming and a recently-diagnosed brain tumor, Spass is running out of time and inspiration – until the real Max Nomax mysteriously appears in the world of 21stcentury Los Angeles with no memory of how he got there, only a terrifying warning of imminent destruction and a mission for Ray Spass.

Ray’s tumor is the key—it contains all the information of Nomax’s adventures, uploaded into Ray’s head before Nomax made his great escape.  Now, Ray has to finish his screenplay in order to get the information out of his head and shrink the tumor. Nomax needs Ray to finish the screenplay so he can remember how to defeat VADA and ultimately save the universe from extinction – if Makro, the unstoppable rogue Annihilator, doesn’t kill get to them first, that is.

But who or what is Max Nomax really?  And why is it the more we learn, the less we want to know?  A heart-stopping suspense thriller. A love story. An impossible mystery. A tale of vengeance and defiance – bargains and consequences – life and death – good and evil.