Tattoo Tuesday: Brian K. Vaughan’s Saga & Y the Last Man Comics

With the return of Saga last week, I thought it was the perfect time to dedicate a Tattoo Tuesday to one of my favorite comic book authors, Brian K. Vaughan!

You’re doing yourself a great disservice if you’re not reading Saga yet. But seriously, what are you waiting for?! I blogged about Saga being my favorite comic book series of 2012 and it hasn’t let me down yet. Whether you fell in love with Yorick, Mitchell, Nico or Alana, we’re all part of the BKV family!

Read more when I saw BKV at NYCC las year here and here.

I include all the information about each tattoo that was available. If you’re interested in your tattoo being featured on a past or future Tattoo Tuesday or Tattoo Tuesday Featurette, email me at jamila[@]girlgonegeekblog[.]com.

Girl Gone Geek Blog Brian K Vaughan Saga Comic Tattoo

Girl Gone Geek Blog Brian K Vaughan Saga Comic Tattoo_v2

Saga #1 cover tattoo from the  [Source 1 Source 2]

Girl Gone Geek Blog Brian K Vaughan Saga Comic Tattoo 2

Izabel from Saga [Source]

Girl Gone Geek Blog Brian K Vaughan Y the last man Comic Tattoo 2

Poppy’s Y the Last man tattoo [Source]

Girl Gone Geek Blog Brian K Vaughan Y the last man Comic Tattoo 3“From Jed K. in Revelo, Ky.: “My tattoo is of very last page fromY: The Last Man #60, the last issue of the series. It is Yorick’s straitjacket flying through the air.”

He adds, “I got this tattoo after I finished my graduate degree. It is my first and only tattoo. The reasons I picked this image are twofold: First of all, I really like the series and hated to see it go. Secondly, the open straitjacket represented freedom from expectations and freedom to do what I wanted to do with my life. Sappy, I know, but I’m a bit sentimental that way.” [Source]

Girl Gone Geek Blog Brian K Vaughan Y the last man Comic Tattoo

Y the Last Man [Source]

Girl Gone Geek Blog Brian K Vaughan Y the last man Comic Tattoo ampersand

Jennifer said, “An ampersand on my left wrist, to symbolize writing, plurality, a general dorky love of punctuation, and a character from my favorite comic (Ampersand the monkey fromY: The Last Man.)” [Source]

NYCC- Writers Room: Grant Morrison, Brian K. Vaughan & Jonathan Hickman

“Writers block is another word for video games.” – BVK

Panelists: Grant Morrison, Brian K. Vaughan, Jonathan Hickman and moderated  Ron Richards

  • –  On the topic of scripts, Brian K. Vaughan said that for him they are a love letter from him to his artist.
  • –  A fan asked if the writers have the entire story outlined or predetermined before beginning a new series. BKV felt that writers are the pilot of an airplane, either you know what you’re doing from the beginning, or you don’t let anyone know that you have no idea what you’re talking about.
  • –  The writers had very different styles of how they approach the art of the comic. BVK told us that Fiona Staples (artist for Saga) doesn’t like to know what’s going to happen in the series, she likes to be surprised every time she gets a new script.
  • –  Ever wonder what happens when the art doesn’t quite match what the writer had in mind? Grant Morrison said he never asks artists to redraw anything, you work around it. His fellow panelists agreed.

    Ran into BVK on the show floor and he signed my TPB of Saga. He was very nice!

  • –  An audience member wanted to know how the writers decide on how many panels to put on each page. BVK feels that 5 panels and about 12 balloons work for him. It’s like a haiku, it feels right.
  • –  Jonathan Hickman said that 5 panels a page also gives the artist a chance to have a stellar panel in the middle of the page.
  • – BVK’s writing style starts off with long drafts and then he edits and cuts and hopes the good stuff is left. After years of writing he likes to let the art do the talking when possible.
  • –  On the subject of voice, Morrison stated that he hears the voices of the characters in his head. He knows them, he knows what they like and what they don’t like, so it’s easier to write in their voice. Vaughan stated he is the complete opposite.
  • –  A fan asked how they deal with reader feedback and all panelists agreed that they don’t care. BVK explained further, “It’s the writer versus him or herself, I don’t care about feedback.” Morrison admitted that, “We don’t even know how to deal with feedback,” Hickman rounded out the answer, “No one hates me like me. I’m way rougher on myself than anyone else.”
  •  – When it comes to starting and leaving an ongoing series, BVK compared it to a relationship. You love them and then you leave them and you want them to be happy, you just don’t want to see it.

    Grant Morrison

  • –  On the importance of  adding autobiographical elements to their work, Morrison likes to write about situations that he’s experienced. BVK agreed that it’s the surest way to make something unique.
  • –  When asked what they do about writer’s block, the panelists stated they don’t experience writers block. When it comes down to it, writing is supposed to be hard. If you’re feeling like you’re in a rut, you have to push through it.  Vaughan said, “Writers block is another word for video games.”

NYCC 2012- Brian K. Vaughan, Brian Wood and More Discuss Sci-Fi at Image Comics

Fiona Staples and Brian K. Vaughan of Saga

Fractured Futures: Speculative Fiction & Image Comics Panel

Science fiction embodies different elements to different people. This panel took a look into what sci-fi means to these writers and illustrators and how they use it to shape their work in Image Comics. The panelists included Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples (Saga), David Hine (Storm Dogs), Joe Harris (Great Pacific), Glen Brunswick (Non-Humans) and Brian Wood and Ming Doyle (Mara).

Brian Wood said that in Mara, the sci-fi is less about the actual technology and more about how it affects the characters in his story. It’s about how we as humans realistically react to fantastical elements. They all admitted there are different types of sci-fi, which we can all attest to. There’s apocalyptic, cyberpunk, science fantasy, or how Brian K. Vaughan likes to describes Saga, fakey make-believe.

BKV said that he used to have friends who liked science fiction and those who liked fantasy, but never both. Saga is both, there’s magic and space ships. When going into depth about the reasoning behind the character design and world building, BKV wanted to use, “simple iconography for each world”. Whether it’s wings, horns or television heads, there’s no mistaking each world and its people. We instantly know what team they play for.

Fiona Staples, the artists for Saga, explained that she isn’t a fan of drawing tech, “I always put character first when I design these things”. BKV said he pretty much gives her a lot of free reign of the character design. Fun fact: Vaughan showed Staples a bong as a reference for his dragon skull space ship.

A fan asked the reasoning behind the characters non-violence stance. Vaughan joked, “I have kids now and my major question is what order to show the Star Wars movies to them.” On a more serious note, most of the panelist agreed that, as a creator you love violence, but as a human being you abhor it, so you face a creative crossroads.

BVK shared his thoughts on Saga becoming a film, “That part is cool, and I’m happy to sell out. Beyond that, I don’t really care. My idea director for ‘Saga’ is Fiona, and my ideal cast are the ones that Fiona draws. The comic is a destination; it’s not a blueprint for something else.”

Runaways- The Movie

I’m not sure how Marvel Studios finds the time but they have are the beginning stages of yet another new project! Runaways is set to be released Summer of 2012.  They are scheduled to start production on March of 2011 in LA, just a month after The Avengers begins shooting.   The casting rumors haven’t began yet but Peter Scollett (Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist) is signed on to direct.

“Debuting in 2003 from creators Brian K. Vaughan and Adrian Alphona, Runaways is an award-winning comic series which follows the story of a group of six teenagers who learn that their parents are super-villains. Together they gather weapons and run away to learn more about themselves and the powers they have, using them for good. (Screen Rant)

I haven’t read Runaways, but as we all know comic book movies are either hit or miss so we’ll just have to wait see as the production progresses.  But if it does well, who knows we might see more Runaways films, TV shows, etcetera, etcetera.

[Source Screen Rant]